MENU

Blue prince black sheep | Interview with Amancio Gonzalez...

NUOVI SGUARDI | Why are you laughing? | Come...

5 settembre 2019 Commenti disabilitati su Rianto: the portrait of an uncoded dance ENG|ITA Views: 171 In depth, News, Photo Gallery, Photo Gallery | Riccardo Panozzo, Posts, Read, Senza categoria

Rianto: the portrait of an uncoded dance ENG|ITA

La versione in tialiano segue quella inglese, dopo la photo gallery.

ENG|Rianto is an Indonesian dancer and choreographer. He trained as a Javanese ballet dancer and in popular oriental Javanese dance from a very young age, specialising in the traditional dance of Lengger. Rianto now lives in Tokyo, where he founded the Javanese ballet dance company Dewandaru Dance Company in 2013. He has worked for many international companies and choreographers, such as Akram Khan, who included him in his piece Until the Lions in 2016. Even if he lives in Japan, Banyumas, his town of birth, remains for him a source of inspiration and of gradual self-rediscovery, and he returns there every year to organise a Lengger festival and to prevent the culture and the traditions of his community from disappearing for ever.

“My dancing is a gift that comes from the ancients” these are the words Rianto started off with in front of those people that were sitting down in a circle, ready to experiment with his practice during the week dedicated to BMotion Dance. “I was born in a village on the Indonesian Island of Java, mine was a poor family, a family of farmers- he continued in a soft and quiet voice. I was born with a birthmark on my forehead. My mother was very worried about that mark and about the bad luck it could bring to my life. When I was just two weeks- old, a dance show was held in my village. My mother asked one of the dancers to give me her blessing, so that the blue mark on my forehead would disappear. The dancer used a little make-up to mark my face. I haven’t stopped dancing since then.”
Rianto never fails to mention that he comes from a simple life, made of few things. His deep gaze on the world comes from there, from a strong bond with the traditions of his homeland, where body and nature are synonymous with knowledge, communication and sharing. When you meet him, you have the impression of sitting down under the same, dark sky, but while he is able to see entire constellations, you are capable at best to spot a few stars. Body, nature, energy and spirituality are the key points that come back over and over again in his words and that resurface even while he dances, when he seems to connect with something otherworldly, that doesn’t belong just to this time and this space, and of which we can only be spectators.
“I believe in the different color of energy. I believe in the different sounds of each country”, he said while asking the dancers -and non-dancers – attending the workshop to close their eyes and reconnect with their own individual memory, trying to bring back to the surface an inner world made of verbal sounds, those that we were able to hear and recognise so clearly as kids: the cry of a gecko, the clucking of a hen, the cooing of a pigeon. A call back to the nature of every part of the world- for the diversity of origin of the participants- and to one’s own small and big archive, now shared in a chorus of voices.
“I come from a simple life, where there are no means other than the body, and the human body is a medium of communication and of connection- he replied when I asked him why he didn’t ask those present to make any form of physical contact, building dialogue solely through the use of memory and sound. “Our body is a library of memories and data. Since I was a kid until today when I am 38, through the skin, the bones, the blood, I have raked -and still do to this day- different memories and information even on the same experiences. The small eyes of a kid can only see with the small eyes of a child, but we don’t only have two eyes, we have thousands of them according to the different stages in life. The same experiences at different points in life bring different information to the body, one can be stronger than the other but it coexists with the other. Our body is a big library. During the workshop- he went on- I tried to make people connect with nature, and nature means body, because it is part of it. I tried to connect our small, single universe to the big collective universe. It is a kind of connection that happens outside the body, outside of the visual component, that travels from the brain to the sensation, from the memory of the individual body to the big collective universe. It’s a spiritual connection. Experimenting with animal language, and trying to recover in our own “library” the sound of the lizard, the hen, or the pigeon, the body creates new expressions connected to a distant primigenial memory. It’s a way to come back to our origins. I also used branches in the woods that became bridges connecting two and more bodies, everyone could feel the specific and painful weight of the other on their skin. It is a method to understand the other.”


How can we come back to the origin?
“For me to come back to the origin means go back to a simple life, that’s why in my dancing I work with animal sounds which live the place where I grew up. In identifying ourselves in very simple things we can connect with nature and with others, thanks to the work of the brain that draws from all the memories contained in our body-library. In connection with each other we can fill the body with new energy. We are making a very long journey whose destination is unknown. During my journey I never stopped to ask myself who I am, to look for a definition of myself, if I am male, if I am female: I am simply body. In Lengger dance there are no gender limits. It is a total heaven to earth connection. It is a faith. Faith in the body. I believe in body.”
Lengger is a crossgender dance originating from the island of Java. A traditional dance that Rianto learned from old masters and practiced since he was a child, and that today risks to disappear because it is opposed by the conservative Islamic culture. Rianto has learned and refined both the styles of the feminine and masculine form, getting in a little bit of time to mix the tradition and an ever more articulated physicality.
“Medium” – his first solo work- takes place from here, in 2016. Medium is a vertical dance in which every movement is connected to nature: the rhythm of the flow of the river, the movement of the fish that swims. Everything passes through the body, which together with the music becomes the bridge for an otherworldly journey. Not just a shamanic dance but also an act of r-existence.
“What interests me is that beyond gender there is a connection between beings through sound. Politics and religion are based on codes. I am an uncoded. My language is not caged in political or religious codes, which impose a choice. Mine is a transversal language, I use sounds and memory to connect to something beyond us, beyond this sky, beyond this time. It is a state of trance; a pure and direct passage.”
On the stage next to Rianto there is always Cahwati, his partner, friend, musician, co-author, his family as he called her when he presented her to everyone. Cahwati has a heavenly voice. The sonorities of her voice are freed in the space like the great wings that lighten the body, lift it to make him complete the journey.

“Cahwati and I grew up together. I know her body and she knows mine. It is not a question of gender. There is no such distance between us. It is a continuous flow of mutual knowledge. Between us there is profound knowledge, and simplicity. Even the musical instruments we use are simple instruments that come from the forest. We have created our music together, and together, on our journey, which is also a spiritual one, we have tried to create a bridge between body and music, body and soul and everything that comes from our “library”. A bridge between the body and the rhythm of life. It is a way to reach the connection with one’s soul. The body believes in the soul. And the soul can have different colors. Every body carries all the colors of the soul. All these rainbows make the color of life so kaleidoscopic.”

Rita Borga
English translation by Elena Baggio
Photos: courtesy by Riccardo Panozzo

 

  • Medium by Rianto. Photo by Riccardo Pannozzo
  • Medium by Rianto. Photo by Riccardo Pannozzo
  • Medium by Rianto. Photo by Riccardo Pannozzo
  • Medium by Rianto. Photo by Riccardo Pannozzo
  • Medium by Rianto. Photo by Riccardo Pannozzo
  • Medium by Rianto. Photo by Riccardo Pannozzo
  • Medium by Rianto. Photo by Riccardo Pannozzo
  • Medium by Rianto. Photo by Riccardo Pannozzo
  • _DSC4174Medium by Rianto. Photo by Riccardo Pannozzo
  • _DMedium by Rianto. Photo by Riccardo PannozzoSC4191
  • Medium by Rianto. Photo by Riccardo Pannozzo
  • Medium by Rianto. Photo by Riccardo Pannozzo
  • Medium by Rianto. Photo by Riccardo Pannozzo
  • Medium by Rianto. Photo by Riccardo Pannozzo
  • Medium by Rianto. Photo by Riccardo Pannozzo
  • Medium by Rianto. Photo by Riccardo Pannozzo
  • Medium by Rianto. Photo by Riccardo Pannozzo
  • Medium by Rianto. Rianto and Cahwati. Photo by Riccardo Pannozzo
  • Medium by Rianto. Rianto and Cahwati. Photo by Riccardo Pannozzo
  • Medium by Rianto. Photo by Riccardo Pannozzo
  • Medium by Rianto. Photo by Riccardo Pannozzo
  • Medium by Rianto. Photo by Riccardo Pannozzo
  • Medium by Rianto. Photo by Riccardo Pannozzo
  • Medium by Rianto. Photo by Riccardo Pannozzo
  • Medium by Rianto. Rianto and Cahwati. Photo by Riccardo Pannozzo

ITA|Rianto è un danzatore e coreografo indonesiano. Si è formato nella danza classica giavanese e nella danza popolare giavanese orientale sin dalla tenera età, specializzandosi nella danza tradizionale Lengger. Ora vive a Tokyo, dove nel 2003 ha fondato la compagnia di danza classica giavanese Dewandaru Dance Company. Ha lavorato per molte compagnie e coreografi internazionali come Akram Khan che nel 2016 l’ha voluto nel suo Until the Lions. Nonostante viva in Giappone, Banyumas – la sua città natale – rimane per lui una fonte di ispirazione e di graduale riscoperta di sé. Qui ritorna annualmente per organizzare un festival di Lengger e impedire che la cultura e le tradizioni della sua comunità vadano perdute per sempre.

“Il mio danzare è un dono che arriva dagli antichi”. Ha esordito così Rianto di fronte alle persone sedute per terra a cerchio pronte a sperimentare la sua pratica durante la settimana dedicata a BMotion Danza. “Sono nato in un villaggio sull’isola indonesiana di Giava; la mia era una famiglia povera, di contadini – ha continuato con tono tenue e caldo – Sono nato con una voglia sulla fronte. Mia madre era molto preoccupata per quel segno e per la sfortuna che poteva portare nella mia vita. Quando avevo solo due settimane, nel mio villaggio si tenne uno spettacolo di danza. Mia madre chiese a una delle danzatrici di benedirmi, in modo che il segno blu sulla mia fronte scomparisse. La ballerina utilizzò un po’ di trucco per segnare il mio viso. Da allora non ho più smesso di danzare.”
Rianto non dimentica mai una volta di dire che proviene da una vita semplice, fatta di poche cose. Il suo sguardo profondo sul mondo arriva da lì, da un forte legame con le tradizioni della sua terra, dove corpo e natura sono sinonimi di conoscenza, comunicazione e condivisione. Quando lo incontri hai come l’impressione di essere seduto sotto lo stesso cielo buio, ma mentre lui riesce a vedere intere costellazioni tu al massimo riesci a scorgere una manciata di stelle. Corpo, natura, energia, spiritualità sono i punti cardinali che ritornano più e più volte nelle sue parole e che riaffiorano anche mentre danza, quando sembra arrivare a connettersi con qualcosa di ultraterreno, che non appartiene solo a questo tempo e a questo spazio, e di cui noi possiamo essere solo spettatori.
I believe in the different color of energy. I believe in the different sounds of each country” ha detto mentre chiedeva ai danzatori, e non, presenti al workshop di chiudere gli occhi e riconnettersi con la propria memoria individuale, provando a riportare a galla un mondo interiore fatto di suoni verbali, quelli che da bambini riuscivamo a sentire e a riconoscere tanto nitidamente: il verso del geco, il chiocciare della gallina, il grugare del piccione. Un richiamo alla natura di ogni parte del mondo – per la diversità di provenienza dei partecipanti – e al proprio piccolo e grande archivio, ora condiviso in un coro di voci.

“Provengo da una vita semplice, dove non ci sono altri mezzi che il corpo, e il corpo umano è un medium di comunicazione e connessione – ha risposto quando gli ho domandato come mai non avesse chiesto nessun tipo di contatto fisico agli astanti ma avesse costruito il dialogo solo attraverso l’uso della memoria e del suono. “Il nostro corpo è una biblioteca di memorie e dati. Da quando ero bambino, a oggi che ho 38 anni, attraverso la pelle, le ossa, il sangue ho incamerato, e continuo tutt’ora a farlo, memorie e informazioni diverse anche delle stesse esperienze. Gli occhi piccoli di un bambino sanno vedere solo con gli occhi piccoli di un bambino ma noi non abbiamo solo due occhi, ne abbiamo mille a seconda dei diversi stadi della vita. Le stesse esperienze, in periodi diversi della vita, portano al corpo informazioni diverse; una può essere più forte dell’altra ma convive insieme all’altra. Il nostro corpo è una grande biblioteca. Durante il workshop – ha continuato – ho cercato di mettere in connessioni le persone con la natura, e natura significa corpo, perché è parte di essa. Ho cercato di connettere il nostro piccolo singolo universo al grande universo collettivo. È un tipo di connessione che avviene fuori dal corpo, fuori dalla componente visuale, che viaggia dal cervello alla sensazione, dalla memoria del corpo singolo al grande universo collettivo. È una connessione spirituale. Sperimentando il linguaggio animale, e cercando di recuperare nella nostra biblioteca il suono della lucertola, della gallina, o del piccione, il corpo crea delle nuove espressioni connesse a una memoria primigenia ormai distante. È un modo per tornare alle nostre origini. Ho utilizzato anche dei rami raccolti nel bosco che sono diventati dei ponti di connessione tra due e più corpi, ognuno poteva sentire sulla propria pelle il peso specifico e doloroso dell’altro. È un metodo per comprendere l’altro.”

Ma come possiamo tornare alle origini?
“Per me tornare alle origini significa tornare a un vita semplice per questo anche nella mia danza utilizzo i suoni degli animali che abitavano i luoghi in cui sono cresciuto. Nell’immedesimarci in cose molto semplici possiamo connetterci con la natura e con gli altri, grazie al lavoro del cervello che va ad attingere a tutte le memorie contenute nel nostro corpo-libreria. Nella connessione con l’altro possiamo riempire il corpo di nuova energia. Stiamo compiendo un viaggio molto lungo di cui non conosciamo la destinazione. Durante il mio cammino non mi sono mai soffermato a chiedermi chi sono, a cercare una definizione di me stesso, se sono maschio, se sono femmina: sono semplicemente corpo. Nella danza Lengger non ci sono limiti di genere. È una connessione cielo/terra totale. È una fede. La fede nel corpo. I believe in body.”
Lengger è una danza crossgender originaria dell’isola di Giava. Una danza tradizionale che Rianto ha appreso da vecchi maestri e praticato fin da piccolo, e che oggi rischia di scomparire perché avversata dalla cultura islamica conservatrice. Rianto ha imparato e raffinato entrambi gli stili della forma femminile e maschile, arrivando un po’ alla volta a mischiare la tradizione e una sempre più articolata fisicità. Da qui nel 2016 è nato “Medium”, il suo primo lavoro da solista. “Medium” è una danza verticale in cui ogni movimento è collegato alla natura: il ritmo dello scorrere del fiume, il movimento del pesce che nuota. Tutto passa attraverso il corpo, che insieme alla musica diviene il ponte per un viaggio ultraterreno. Non solo una danza sciamanica ma anche un atto di r-esistenza.
“Quel che mi interessa è che al di là del genere ci sia grazie al suono una connessione fra gli esseri. Politica e religione sono basati su codici. Io sono uncoded. Il mio linguaggio non è ingabbiato in codici politici o religiosi, che impongono una scelta. Il mio è un linguaggio trasversale, utilizzo i suoni e la memoria per connettermi a qualcosa che sta oltre noi, oltre questo cielo, oltre questo tempo. È uno stato di trance; un passaggio puro e diretto.”
Sul palco accanto a Rianto c’è sempre Cahwati, sua partner, amica, musicista, co-autrice, la sua famiglia come l’ha chiamata lui quando l’ha presentata a tutti. Cahwati ha una voce celestiale. Le sonorità della sua voce si liberano nello spazio come delle grandi ali che alleggerendo il corpo, lo sollevano per fargli compiere il viaggio.

“Cahwati ed io siamo cresciuti insieme. Io conosco il suo corpo e lei conosce il mio. Non è una questione di genere. Non c’è questa distanza tra di noi. È un flusso continuo di conoscenza reciproca. Tra di noi c’è conoscenza profonda, e semplicità. Anche gli strumenti musicali che utilizziamo sono strumenti semplici, che arrivano dalla foresta. Abbiamo creato insieme la nostra musica, e insieme, nel nostro viaggio, che è anche un viaggio spirituale, abbiamo cercato di creare un ponte tra il corpo e la musica, il corpo e l’anima e tutto ciò che arriva dalla nostra “biblioteca”. Un ponte tra il corpo e il ritmo della vita. È un modo per arrivare alla connessione con la propria anima. Il corpo crede nell’anima. E l’anima può avere dei colori diversi. Ogni corpo porta con sé tutti i colori dell’anima. Sono tutti questi arcobaleni che rendono così caleidoscopico il colore della vita.”

Rita Borga

Operaestate Festival | BMotion Danza, 2019 |21 agosto 2019
CSC Garage Nardini, Bassano del Grappa (VI)
Prima nazionale
RIANTO|MEDIUM
coreografia e interpretazione Rianto
musica Cahwati

commissionato da: Esplanade-Theatres on the Bay (Singapore), 
Performance Space, National Kaohsiung Center of Arts (Weiwuying), 
deSingel Internationale Kunstcampus, Staadstheatre Darmstadt.
Con il supporto di Kommunitas Salihara, Darwin Festival

Tags: , , ,

Comments are closed.