MENU

REVIEW | “Manifesto Cannibale” by Francesca Pennini/CollettivO CineticO ENG/ITA

INTERVIEW | Alessandro Sciarroni. A fragment from the whole

4 settembre 2023 Commenti disabilitati su REVIEW | “Urutau Exctinction Party” by Francesca Pennini/ CollettivO CineticO Views: 857 News, Photo Gallery, Read, Reviews, Watch

REVIEW | “Urutau Exctinction Party” by Francesca Pennini/ CollettivO CineticO

Sincerity of bodies

“There is a difference between being serious and being sincere. In frivolity there is a lightness which can rise but in seriousness there is a gravity that falls like a stone.”

Alan Watts

“When time pulls lives apart

Hold your own

When everything is fluid, and when nothing can be known with any certainty

Hold your own

Hold it ‘til you feel it there

As dark, and dense, and wet as earth

As vast, and bright, and sweet as air

When all there is

Is knowing that you feel what you are feeling

Hold your own”

Kae Tempest, Hold Your Own

After having seen Manifesto Cannibale – after having been through it, experimented with it, shared it – we sat ourselves down in the audience to participate in Urutau Extinction Party, the culmination of a workshop held by Francesca Pennini and ColletivO CineticO during BMotion Danza.

Urutau is the flamboyant and colourful supplement to Manifesto Cannibale, its fitting epilogue. Female circus animal tamers, white suited males, brides also in white, youths swagger with French-style neckerchiefs: all sorts assemble before us.

The soundtrack to this astute simulation of waiting for the end of the world – so tender, elaborate and yet so light – was once again developed from an audience-suggested playlist which pits pop’s cult favourites with classical repertoire.

The dissonant yet welcoming words of Alan Watts hold us all in a warm embrace. We catch a few phrases — “And the fundamental game that the universe is playing […] the invisibility of God is his self-forgetfulness. And the visibility of the world is the game being played.”

A giant red balloon in the middle of the bodies keeps watches over us in silence, until the dance ends and the performance begins. “There is no time for the end”. The game of resistance has begun: the performers are quite motionless, we know not when the end will come. We spectators become part of this static exhaustion of control, in this shared test of endurance.

Whenever one of the performers gives in and moves, they wipe the sweat from their face with the white linen placed central stage, rubbing off the red blusher that sets their cheeks on fire. The residue of make-up built up on the sheet soon appear as blood stains.

Then the bride departs the scene, having been overcome by a physiological frisson. At each exit from the stage, at each abandonment, at each surrender, at each rite of passage, we witness dramaturgical micro-detonations, brought on by a short-circuit between the soundtrack and the performer’s action.

Metamorphosis of bodies

What happens to a body forced into immobility for any length of time? Like callous entomologists, we stay to observe the reaction of every cell, every fibre, every muscle, every breath, every vascular irregularity in the bodies our subjects.

What happens when the force of gravity batters down on the skeleton, when the body yields to the tension of this force, experiencing it throughout the surface of the body, all over the epidermis and then deeper into the muscles, deeper into the bones.

We survey one case in particular, with analytical attention, for he is closest to us. At first he appears handsome, strong, triumphant. But slowly his deglutition pattern becomes syncopated, beads of sweat line his face and accrue under his chin, nose, neck, arms. Undertones of muscular resistance verge on convulsing him in taciturn gasps as the invisible force of gravity continues to push him down. Does his neck and head begin to bow? We peer with impudent insistence at the incredible beauty generated by his silent, stubborn resistance becoming matter. We peer through his body to those of the other subjects, offered as a vision to us of the exact moment that marks the transition, the transformation, the passage from vertical body to horizontal corpse.

Numbed, our executant sluggishly approaches the sheet, the body racked by fatigue, wrapping his face in that ashen shroud that connects us to deep, early cultural memories: a gesture of farewell, of lamentation, of burial, of death and yet also to a soteriological promise of resurrection.

A young female performer continues to resist, fragile and trembling, conferring an intense, self-effacing, delicate beauty. We observe her long slender fingers, her stretched expressive hands, her angular elbows. We sense her fatigued breathing, her stifled gasps and the cries of her internal organs: her heart pounding, her bowels in revolt, her lungs exhausting themselves.

A well-known Gino Paoli song fills the air: “Quando sei qui con me questa stanza non ha più pareti…” (When you are here with me this room no longer has walls…). Ten players remain on stage now. The one dressed as a circus tamer is next to exit the game. She too wipes off the sweaty blusher from her cheeks, adding to the shroud’s impression of ruddy smears.

Overwhelmed by the ingenious alternation of perceptual patterns – sight and sound, sound and sight, sight and sound – we close our eyes and abandon ourselves to the shadows of pre-vision, just imagining what is happening or what might happen on stage while we take a visual interlude.

Survivor by Destiny’s Child succeeds Mercedes Sosa’s Todo Cambia, which follows Arvo Pärt’s Für Alina, which comes after Kae Tempest’s Hold Your Own, which follows…

And we remember that we too, during the endless lockdown period, in the midst of the pandemic, spent most of our time listening to music from YouTube playlists.

The frozen image of these bodies is a perfect, sublime, timeless snapshot of that chilling state that we were all then forced to endure. And the music condenses all the emotional warmth that kept us alive amidst the ice of enforced isolation.

After yet another performer has left the stage, another powerful dramaturgical micro-explosion is discharged, aided by the new framework of bodies in space and music. The girl with the pianist’s hands is now facing a boy dressed in white. He has clenched his fists. She has an air of reluctance and defensiveness. A pop song happens to interpret a dialogue between these two bodies, standing still in space amongst a few other survivors. Once again, music lights up the hitherto mute presence with meaning, illuminating the possible relationships between these bodies. Is there a love affair between the couple? Some story between man and woman? A coming together? A breaking up? A quarrel? A duel? Surprisingly perhaps, after a stretch of time, it is he who gives in, who succumbs under the ineluctable weight of gravity. He withdraws from the diegesis, removing the red from his cheeks with spite, a wounded warrior now vanquished in war.

These bodies on stage, who have passed through immobility, touching that shroud so as to ratify their farewell to the audience. A rite of passage towards a non-stage, a non-visible elsewhere/no-where, which almost all the spectators (or perhaps we should say ‘participants’) are moved to comment on with applause.

Anna Trevisan

English translation by Jim Sunderland

Photos and cover image by Riccardo Panozzo

 


TESTO ITALIANO

La sincerità dei corpi

“There is a difference between being serious and being sincere. In frivolity there is a lightness which can rise but in seriousness there is a gravity that falls like a stone.”

Alan Watts

 

“When time pulls lives apart

Hold your own

When everything is fluid, and when nothing can be known with any certainty

Hold your own

Hold it ‘til you feel it there

As dark, and dense, and wet as earth

As vast, and bright, and sweet as air

When all there is

Is knowing that you feel what you are feeling

Hold your own”

Kae Tempest, Hold your own

 

Dopo aver visto Manifesto Cannibale – o forse sarebbe meglio dire dopo averlo ‘esperito’, sperimentato, condiviso – ci sediamo tra il pubblico per partecipare a Urutau Extinction Party, risultato di un laboratorio condotto da Francesca Pennini e ColletivO CineticO durante BMotion Danza.

Urutau è il prolungamento sgargiante e colorato di Manifesto Cannibale, il suo epilogo perfetto. In piedi, assembrati tutti insieme, ci sono donne domatrici di circo, uomini in completo bianco, ragazzi spavaldi con fazzolettoni alla francese al collo, spose in bianco…

La colonna sonora di questa geniale simulazione danzante dell’attesa della fine del mondo – così sentimentale ed elucubrata eppure così lieve – è stata costruita, ancora una volta, grazie all’assemblaggio di una playlist suggerita dal pubblico e snocciola grandi cult, dal pop alla musica classica.

La voce off di Alan Watts ci accoglie calda e avvolgente. Afferriamo qualche frase. “The fundamental game of the Universe is the invisibility of God and the visibility of the Word is the play we game”.

Un gigantesco palloncino rosso in mezzo ai corpi ci guarda in silenzio, fino a quando la danza finisce e inizia la performance. “Non è previsto un tempo per la fine”. Il gioco di resistenza è iniziato: l’immobilità dei performer non sappiamo quando finirà. Noi spettatori diventiamo attori compartecipi di questo immobile sfinimento del controllo, di questa gara di resistenza condivisa.

Quando qualcuno dei performer cede al movimento, si deterge il sudore dal volto con il lenzuolo bianco posto al centro della scena, e si pulisce dal trucco rosso che gli infiamma le guance. Il residuo di trucco sul lenzuolo sembra sangue.

La sposa abbandona la scena, vinta da un fremito di movimento. Ad ogni uscita di scena, ad ogni abbandono, ad ogni resa, ad ogni rituale di passaggio, assistiamo a micro-esplosioni drammaturgiche, provocate dal cortocircuito tra colonna sonora e azione del performer.

La metamorfosi dei corpi

Che cosa succede ad un corpo costretto per lungo tempo all’immobilità? Come crudeli entomologi, restiamo ad osservare la reazione di ogni cellula, di ogni fibra, di ogni muscolo, di ogni respiro, di ogni vena nei corpi dei performer.

Che cosa succede quando la forza di gravità si abbatte sullo scheletro, quando il corpo cede alla tensione di questa forza, sperimentandola su tutta la superficie del corpo, su tutta la pelle e poi sempre più in profondità, dentro ai muscoli e alle ossa…?

Osserviamo con attenzione totale la metamorfosi del corpo del performer più vicino a noi. All’inizio è bello, forte, vittorioso. Lentamente, la sua deglutizione diventa sincopata, le gocce di sudore gli rigano il viso e si incollano al mento, al naso, al collo, alle braccia. Accenni di resistenza muscolare lo scuotono in impercettibili sussulti, mentre la forza di gravità  continua invisibile a spingere il suo organismo verso il basso. Il collo e la testa cominciano ad inchinarsi. Scrutiamo con impudente insistenza l’incredibile bellezza generata dalla sua silenziosa, tenace, ostinata resistenza che si fa materia. Scrutiamo grazie al suo corpo e a quello degli altri perfomer offerti in visione per noi l’esatto momento che segna il trapasso, la trasformazione, il passaggio da corpo verticale a ‘corpo grave’.

Con lentezza intorpidita il performer si avvicina al lenzuolo, il corpo offeso dalla stanchezza, e si avvolge il viso in quel sudario bianco che ci connette a memorie culturali radicali, originarie: un gesto di congedo, di pianto, di sepoltura, di morte ma anche di soteriologica promessa di resurrezione.

Una giovane perfomer resiste fragile e tremante, sprigionando un’intensa, inconsapevole, delicata bellezza. Le osserviamo le lunghe dita affusolate e sottili, le mani grandi ed espressive, i gomiti spigolosi. Scrutiamo i suoi sussulti. Sentiamo il suo respiro, e quello dei suoi organi interni: il cuore che pulsa, le viscere in rivolta, i polmoni affaticati.

Nell’aria risuona una nota canzone di Gino Paoli: “Quando sei qui con me questa stanza non ha più pareti…”. Sono rimasti in dieci sulla scena. La perfomer vestita da domatrice di circo abbandona la scena. Si pulisce il rosso sudato del trucco, lasciando un’altra impronta sul lenzuolo-sudario.

Sopraffatti dal geniale alternarsi di pattern percettivi -ascolto e visione, visione e ascolto, ascolto e visione- chiudiamo gli occhi e ci abbandoniamo al buio della pre-visione, immaginando che cosa sta succedendo o che cosa potrebbe succedere in scena mentre noi ci riposiamo.

“I am a survivor” delle Destiny’s Child segue a “Todo cambia” di Mercedes Sosa, che segue a  “Für Alina” di Arvo Pärt che segue a “Hold your own di Kae Tempest che segue a …

E ci ricordiamo che anche noi durante l’infinito periodo del lockdown, in piena Pandemia, il nostro tempo lo passavamo perlopiù ad ascoltare musica dalla playlist di You Tube.

L’immagine congelata di questi corpi è una fotografia perfetta, sublime, fuori dal tempo di quel sentimento musiliano e raggelante alla quale tutti noi siamo stati costretti durante il Covid. E la musica condensa tutto il calore emotivo che ci ha mantenuto in vita in mezzo al ghiaccio dell’isolamento forzato.

Dopo l’ennesima uscita di scena di un altro performer, si verifica un’altra potente micro-esplosione drammaturgica, complice il nuovo quadro di corpi nello spazio e la musica. La ragazza con le mani da pianista è ora di fronte ad un ragazzo vestito di bianco. Lui ha i pungi chiusi. Lei è in un atteggiamento di ritrosia e difesa. Una canzone pop commenta il dialogo tra questi due corpi sopravvissuti, in piedi e fermi nello spazio insieme a pochi altri ancora. Ancora una volta la musica accende di significato la presenza fino a poco prima muta, illuminando le relazioni possibili tra i corpi. È un duello amoroso quello tra i due performer, una storia tra un uomo e una donna, un incontro, uno scontro, un duello, un litigio. A sorpresa, dopo lunghi attimi, è lui a cedere, a soccombere, sotto il peso ineluttabile della forza di gravità. Abbandona la scena, togliendosi il rosso dalle guance con dispetto, come un guerriero ferito e vinto in battaglia.

Questi corpi in scena, che hanno attraversato l’immobilità, toccando quel lenzuolo- sudario suggellano il proprio congedo dal pubblico. Un rito di passaggio verso un Altrove non-scenico, non visibile, che quasi tutti gli spettatori (o forse dovremmo dire “partecipatori”) sentono di dover commentare con un applauso.

Anna Trevisan

Foto e immagine di copertina di Riccardo Panozzo

 

BMotion Danza 2023
19 agosto, Chiesa di San Giovanni
URUTAU EXTINCTION PARTY
Prima Nazionale
Concept, regia, training: Francesca Pennini
Dramaturg, dj set: Angelo Pedroni
Cura del suono e assistenza tecnica: Simone Arganini
Organizzazione, cura: Matilde Buzzoni, Carmine Parise
In scena i partecipanti alla call pubblica dedicata
Coproduzione Operaestate
In collaborazione con Centrale Fies | Art Work Space
Con il sostegno di MIC e Regione Emilia-Romagna

  • BMotion Danza 2023 | "Urutau Extinction Party" by F. Pennini/CollettivO CineticO. Photo by Riccardo Panozzo
  • BMotion Danza 2023 | "Urutau Extinction Party" by F. Pennini/CollettivO CineticO. Photo by Riccardo Panozzo
  • BMotion Danza 2023 | "Urutau Extinction Party" by F. Pennini/CollettivO CineticO. Photo by Riccardo Panozzo
  • BMotion Danza 2023 | "Urutau Extinction Party" by F. Pennini/CollettivO CineticO. Photo by Riccardo Panozzo
  • BMotion Danza 2023 | "Urutau Extinction Party" by F. Pennini/CollettivO CineticO. Photo by Riccardo Panozzo
  • BMotion Danza 2023 | "Urutau Extinction Party" by F. Pennini/CollettivO CineticO. Photo by Riccardo Panozzo
  • BMotion Danza 2023 | "Urutau Extinction Party" by F. Pennini/CollettivO CineticO. Photo by Riccardo Panozzo
  • BMotion Danza 2023 | "Urutau Extinction Party" by F. Pennini/CollettivO CineticO. Photo by Riccardo Panozzo
  • BMotion Danza 2023 | "Urutau Extinction Party" by F. Pennini/CollettivO CineticO. Photo by Riccardo Panozzo
  • BMotion Danza 2023 | "Urutau Extinction Party" by F. Pennini/CollettivO CineticO. Photo by Riccardo Panozzo
  • BMotion Danza 2023 | "Urutau Extinction Party" by F. Pennini/CollettivO CineticO. Photo by Riccardo Panozzo
  • BMotion Danza 2023 | "Urutau Extinction Party" by F. Pennini/CollettivO CineticO. Photo by Riccardo Panozzo
  • BMotion Danza 2023 | "Urutau Extinction Party" by F. Pennini/CollettivO CineticO. Photo by Riccardo Panozzo
  • BMotion Danza 2023 | "Urutau Extinction Party" by F. Pennini/CollettivO CineticO. Photo by Riccardo Panozzo
  • BMotion Danza 2023 | "Urutau Extinction Party" by F. Pennini/CollettivO CineticO. Photo by Riccardo Panozzo
  • BMotion Danza 2023 | "Urutau Extinction Party" by F. Pennini/CollettivO CineticO. Photo by Riccardo Panozzo
  • BMotion Danza 2023 | "Urutau Extinction Party" by F. Pennini/CollettivO CineticO. Photo by Riccardo Panozzo

Tags:

Comments are closed.